Q&A: What sword was the most effective in history?

Question by Jade Rat: What sword was the most effective in history?
As in like, the Japanese Katana, the Roman Gladius, Scottish Claymore things like that.

What had the biggest impact? Was was the most balanced?

I think, the Japanese Katana was the best, It was light, very durable folded sometimes as many 900 times, it wasn’t much for cutting though thick metal armor though- although the Japanese preferred lighter leather armor at the time.

It was so effective, it was doubled as a shield in the hands of a skilled swordsmen.

Best answer:

Answer by miltonfinster
The ExCalibur

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12 thoughts on “Q&A: What sword was the most effective in history?

  1. i think ur right. the romans used short swords to fight in units. the scots long to fight gorrila war fair…the scots are famous for their spears against cavalry.

  2. Well if swords were part of the general arms race it would be the broadsword. Almost every Asian and European’s last swords were a variation of the broadsword.

  3. The Katana is the best.

    However the ones wielded by religious fanatics (the crusades, spanish conquistadors) always seem to spill the most blood.

  4. I like the classic Italian Rapier, preferably made of Damascus steal. Double edged, with a 3 ft. blade and a nice hand guard that could also be skillfully used to disarm another opponent.

  5. Respectful I would say the traditional Katana when a true Samurai used it. Now on a much lower note and depending on your views a disrespectful side a more mightier sword if you will that is concealed for the biggest part of its life has caused more damage than any other. Each and every man has one. because it produces just another one that later in life gets into another fight that has no end.

  6. The sword has been an evolutionary weapon, starting with some bladed implement (spear tip or knife – more likely the knife) and through several iterations based on time (era), metalurgical sophistication, tactics, migrated into current-era bayonets.

    Some are for stabbing, some are for slashing, some chop, etc.

    One of the most impactful in changing combat tactics was the sabre, used for mounted cavalry (cavalry used to have barding and the tactic was to steamroller foot soldiers, the sabre allowed mounted troops to run through and break up battle formations), but one of the longest in historic use was the short sword, the most famous and arguably ideal design was the Roman Gladius.

    The Katana was a wonderful, beautiful weapon, but it’s long arduous time to manufacture and expense made it a class or caste based weapon. In battle, only the elite had katanas – decades of training was required to master the weapon.

    For practical purposes, a weapons’ utility also has to be measured by a few additional factors: its ease in manufacture, its ease of distribution to the largest number of troops trained in its use, etc.

    My vote is for the Gladius, as a soldier could be trained to use it effectively in a couple hours, efficiently in a few weeks – it was easy to manufacture and distribute. It could pierce, chop, slash or bash and used with or without shield (long sheild, buckler, kite or tower, flexible in its use and ulitilty in open or close rank, and can be slung to free up the soldiers hand without creating a tripping hazard for himself or others.

  7. That would depend on what time frame you want to look at. Most swords are made for different uses.

    The Gladius was made to cut your enemy to pieces and thrust.
    I think the Katana would have to be the best.

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