Medieval Clothing

works of mercy (3)

A few nice medieval clothes images I found:

works of mercy (3)
medieval clothes
Image by jimforest
I was naked and you clothed me.

This series of seven medieval paintings (dated 1504) was originally hung in the cathedral in Alkmaar. In each panel, Christ (shown without a halo) is present but unrecognized. In this first panel, he looks directly toward the viewer.

The paintings were damaged by iconoclasts in the late 16th century, during the period of iconoclasm that occurred in the early period of the Reformation. Restoration was carried out about 30 years ago by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. At present, while the Amsterdam museum is being rebuilt, the set is being exhibited at the Boijmans Museum in Rotterdam.

UK – London – Tower of London: White Tower and Wardrobe Tower
medieval clothes
Image by wallyg
The Wardrobe Tower (foreground) was built during the reign of Richard the Lionheart by his rent William Longchamp, Bishop of Ely between 1190-1199, to store clothing, jewels and personal articles of the Royal Family. A portion of the wall of the Roman city of Londinium was found built into the Wardrobe Tower.

The White Tower has given its name to the entire castle—the Tower of London. It is the oldest and largest building of this type in England and was used as a model for later structures.

The White Tower is the oldest medieval building at the Tower of London. It was put up within a slightly earlier fortified enclosure created by William the Conqueror (1066-87). The exact date at which building began is unknown but is traditionally given as 1078 and was started during the reign of the Conqueror. It may have been the work of Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester, a renowned builder of castles and churches.

A massive rectangular tower: 35.m (118ft) by 32.6m (107ft) across and 27.4m (90ft) high, the White Tower was intended to impress, but was also equipped as a fortress and residence, providing accommodations for the King himself.

Sheer scale and quality apart, its main peculiarity is the apsidal (semi-circular) protrusion at its southeast corner which houses the east end of the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist. This feature is shared in England only by the keep in Colchester. It is likely its builders were following a model that had existed in Normandy, William the Conqueror’s homeland.

Since the 11th century the exterior has been altered and repaired but its basic form remains intact. Medieval work was largely confined to maintenance, although Henry III (1216-72) refurbished the Chapel and had the outside of the building whitewashed (giving the tower its name). The roof was also replaced in1490 at a higher level than previously. In later centuries much of the original cut stone from Caen in Normandy was replaced by more durable material from Portland, so that little except the rubble walling remains from the 11th century. Most of the windows and door surrounds were replaced in the 17th and 18th centuries, and new entrances inserted. The Chapel windows were restored in a Romanesque style in 1864. The ornate turret roofs date from the 16th century. Originally they were probably pyramidal.

During the course of its history numerous building have been put up against the White Tower, including a wall linking it to the Wardrobe Tower, the 13th-century Coldharbour gatehouse and a huge annexe to the east (built in the 14th century and heightened in the 19th century). This annexe was demolished in 1879, leaving the White Tower freestanding as its builders intended.

The entrance to the White Tower is through the doorway (now much altered) on the south face, which was protected from attack by being raised well above ground level. It was reached by a timber stair, just as it is today.

Today, the inside of the Tower serves as a museum with exhibits from the Royal Armoury, special rotating exhibits, and the Line of Kings,

UK – London – Tower of London: White Tower
medieval clothes
Image by wallyg
The Wardrobe Tower (foreground) was built during the reign of Richard the Lionheart by his rent William Longchamp, Bishop of Ely between 1190-1199, to store clothing, jewels and personal articles of the Royal Family. A portion of the wall of the Roman city of Londinium was found built into the Wardrobe Tower.

The White Tower has given its name to the entire castle—the Tower of London. It is the oldest and largest building of this type in England and was used as a model for later structures.

The White Tower is the oldest medieval building at the Tower of London. It was put up within a slightly earlier fortified enclosure created by William the Conqueror (1066-87). The exact date at which building began is unknown but is traditionally given as 1078 and was started during the reign of the Conqueror. It may have been the work of Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester, a renowned builder of castles and churches.

A massive rectangular tower: 35.m (118ft) by 32.6m (107ft) across and 27.4m (90ft) high, the White Tower was intended to impress, but was also equipped as a fortress and residence, providing accommodations for the King himself.

Sheer scale and quality apart, its main peculiarity is the apsidal (semi-circular) protrusion at its southeast corner which houses the east end of the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist. This feature is shared in England only by the keep in Colchester. It is likely its builders were following a model that had existed in Normandy, William the Conqueror’s homeland.

Since the 11th century the exterior has been altered and repaired but its basic form remains intact. Medieval work was largely confined to maintenance, although Henry III (1216-72) refurbished the Chapel and had the outside of the building whitewashed (giving the tower its name). The roof was also replaced in1490 at a higher level than previously. In later centuries much of the original cut stone from Caen in Normandy was replaced by more durable material from Portland, so that little except the rubble walling remains from the 11th century. Most of the windows and door surrounds were replaced in the 17th and 18th centuries, and new entrances inserted. The Chapel windows were restored in a Romanesque style in 1864. The ornate turret roofs date from the 16th century. Originally they were probably pyramidal.

During the course of its history numerous building have been put up against the White Tower, including a wall linking it to the Wardrobe Tower, the 13th-century Coldharbour gatehouse and a huge annexe to the east (built in the 14th century and heightened in the 19th century). This annexe was demolished in 1879, leaving the White Tower freestanding as its builders intended.

The entrance to the White Tower is through the doorway (now much altered) on the south face, which was protected from attack by being raised well above ground level. It was reached by a timber stair, just as it is today.

Today, the inside of the Tower serves as a museum with exhibits from the Royal Armoury, special rotating exhibits, and the Line of Kings,

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